Literary Journalism and War

OCLW is acting as project partner to a bid for a research project in development by John S. Bak at the Université de Lorraine. For more information, please see the project webpage

Description: Few would dispute that the violence of war is one of the most horrific experiences to which the human community is exposed. Yet, in modern journalism discourse, we have tended to objectify war to a safe, sublimated distance. In effect, we have made of war a euphemism, which, as the poet Joseph Brodsky observed, “is, generally, the inertia of terror” we do not wish to acknowledge. This is why some journalists turn to literary journalism to account for war, and why the genre is so necessary, even critical, because it helps us to perceive better through the aesthetics of experience the monster of war we have created.

This project proposes first to establish the parameters of the term literary journalism (creative nonfiction, realistic novel, memoir, reportage, journalisme d’immersion, etc.) and the notions of war (not only ‘hot’ wars or ‘cold’ wars but also other conflicts, such as cyber wars). Second, it will examine how those wars have been covered differently by literary journalism than by the traditional press. Third, it will analyze various examples of literary journalism from countries around the world to see if literary journalism unifies the humanities in how it covers war, all the while the war that is being covered divides us further from each other. Topics included will be case studies of wars from colonialist Africa to World War I and from Russia’s involvment in Chechnia to America’s military engagements during the Arab Spring. Research in the form of conference presentations, seminars and book and journal publications (a special issue of Literary Journalism Studies will be edited) will examine how literary journalism tries to balance the bloody with the banal in war reporting.

The long-term project will be to disseminate the project’s research findings to various communities. An online, interactive website will provide a database of literary war journalism written throughout the world. Internauts will be able to click on a country in Europe or Africa, select a site where a war was centralized, and access the various literary journalistic pieces written about that particular site by literary journalists of multiple nations. Additional media will be made available as well, including manuscripts, notebooks, letters, photos, and videos linked to the war and the journalistic piece.

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Carmen
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Barefoot Opera, well known for its strong production values, ensemble work, and fresh interpretation, brings its unique style to the opera everyone knows and loves: 'Carmen' by Bizet. Our brilliant young soloists include young talents from the Guildhall School of Music and the Welsh Opera Academy. At the start of their careers, they will be accompanied by Barefoot Opera’s signature ensemble of free-base accordion double-bass, clarinet, and keyboard.

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Steve Empson: Exhibition Private View
Sunday 30 September - 12:00pm

PRIVATE VIEW - Sunday 30 September from 12 noon to 3 pm.
Steve Empson observes two coastal communities, in Kent and Co Durham, he considers to be similar in many aspects. Both places are out on a limb, and he sees them as being quirky and attractively at the edge of society. In paintings and drawings of mixed media, he attempts to get across his feeling for these places.