Literary Journalism and War

OCLW is acting as project partner to a bid for a research project in development by John S. Bak at the Université de Lorraine. For more information, please see the project webpage

Description: Few would dispute that the violence of war is one of the most horrific experiences to which the human community is exposed. Yet, in modern journalism discourse, we have tended to objectify war to a safe, sublimated distance. In effect, we have made of war a euphemism, which, as the poet Joseph Brodsky observed, “is, generally, the inertia of terror” we do not wish to acknowledge. This is why some journalists turn to literary journalism to account for war, and why the genre is so necessary, even critical, because it helps us to perceive better through the aesthetics of experience the monster of war we have created.

This project proposes first to establish the parameters of the term literary journalism (creative nonfiction, realistic novel, memoir, reportage, journalisme d’immersion, etc.) and the notions of war (not only ‘hot’ wars or ‘cold’ wars but also other conflicts, such as cyber wars). Second, it will examine how those wars have been covered differently by literary journalism than by the traditional press. Third, it will analyze various examples of literary journalism from countries around the world to see if literary journalism unifies the humanities in how it covers war, all the while the war that is being covered divides us further from each other. Topics included will be case studies of wars from colonialist Africa to World War I and from Russia’s involvment in Chechnia to America’s military engagements during the Arab Spring. Research in the form of conference presentations, seminars and book and journal publications (a special issue of Literary Journalism Studies will be edited) will examine how literary journalism tries to balance the bloody with the banal in war reporting.

The long-term project will be to disseminate the project’s research findings to various communities. An online, interactive website will provide a database of literary war journalism written throughout the world. Internauts will be able to click on a country in Europe or Africa, select a site where a war was centralized, and access the various literary journalistic pieces written about that particular site by literary journalists of multiple nations. Additional media will be made available as well, including manuscripts, notebooks, letters, photos, and videos linked to the war and the journalistic piece.

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The latest from Wolfson College

20 May 2019
Expanding the diplomatic toolkit: the further evolution of science diplomacy

The fourth 'Diplomacy for the 21st Century' lecture will be held by Sir Peter Gluckman, Former New Zealand Chief Scientific Officer. 

20 May 2019
Japan's Energy Policy after the Fukushima Disaster

Wolfson College is honoured to welcome Mr Hirose for a lecture on Japan's Energy Policy after the Fukushima Disaster. 

17 May 2019
Wolfson College takes part in International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia

Wolfson College flies the rainbow LGBT flag for the International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia and Biphobia. 

Our upcoming events

Lectures and Seminars
21 - 21
May May
Asian Treasure Traditions Seminar
Tuesday 21 May - 3:00pm to 7:00pm

Anna Sehnalova Tuesday 21st May Seminar Room 3, 5.pm - 7pm, followed by dinner at Wolfson Title: Mountain Deities and Their Treasures: Possible Indigenous Origins of the Tibetan gTer ma tradition

Tuesday 21st May, Reinier Langelaar (IKGA, Austrian Academy of Sciences & Humboldt University of Berlin)

Wolfson College Seminar Room 3, 15:00 - 17:00

Lectures and Seminars
21 - 21
May May
Japan’s Energy Policy After The Fukushima Disaster
Tuesday 21 May - 5:30pm to 6:30pm

Eight years on from the disastrous accident at the Fukushima nuclear plant in Japan, how has the clean-up operation gone; what are Japanese attitudes to nuclear power; and what energy mix is right for a resource-poor economic superpower? Naomi Hirose has for many years been at the helm of The Tokyo Electric Power Company which runs Fukushima, and he is in Oxford, at Wolfson College, to set out his views, and to take all questions.

Lectures and Seminars
23 - 23
May May
Wolfson Lecture Series: Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Expanding the diplomati...
Thursday 23 May - 6:15pm to 7:15pm

Sir Peter Gluckman will deliver the lecture “Expanding the diplomatic toolkit: the further evolution of science diplomacy”.