Annual Aris Lectures

The Annual Aris Lectures were created in 2015 to celebrate Michael and Anthony Aris and their contributions to Tibetan and Himalayan Studies. 

The lectures take place in Michaelmas Term. We are tremendously grateful to all those who have helped to make these lectures possible.

Written versions of the lectures can be downloaded below. Disclaimer: The contents of the lectures does not necessarily represent the opinions of the Tibetan and Himalayan Studies Centre or Wolfson College.

1. Inaugural Aris Lecture, 22 October 2015, 5:30pm, LWA:

Prof. Per Kvaerne (University of Oslo): Presentation of Michael and Anthony Aris

Prof. Janet Gyatso (Harvard University): Beyond Representation and Identity: Opening Ways for Tibetan Studies (original title: Tibetan Studies and its Possible Futures)

This lecture presents methodological reflections on the way scholars of Tibetan Studies approach their subject, and the possible pitfalls of reductionism, functionalism, and culturalism in the discourse on Tibetan civilization. It also introduces some aspects of Janet Gyatso's recent book Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet (2015).

2. Second Aris Lecture, 1 December 2016, 5:30pm, LWA:

Prof. Charles Ramble (EPHE, Paris): Social History and Vampires: the Dark Continents of Tibetan Studies.

A well-known theme in Tibetan literature depicts the land as an area of benighted savagery, peopled by red-faced flesh-eating demons and an even larger population of malign autochthonous powers; the civilising power of Buddhism tamed the humans and their gods, and transformed the land into a fitting receptacle for the Good Law. Almost a thousand years after it was formulated, this story not only continues to provide a prism through which Tibetans view their own history, but it also influences research on Tibet in subtle but significant ways. This talk will support the case for looking beyond the dominant narrative to discern elements that might form the composition of a very different picture.

Prof. Charles Ramble is Directeur d'études at the École Pratique des Hautes Études (Sorbonne). He was the first to teach Tibetan and Himalayan Studies at the University of Oxford from 2000 until 2010.

3. Third Aris Lecture, 16 November 2017, 6:00pm, LWA:

Prof. em. Per Kvaerne (University of Oslo): "Teach me how to be Gesar's Daughter" - Voices of young Tibetan intellectuals in the diaspora.

The young generation of the Tibetan diaspora in India has a high level of education, with many attending universities or colleges. At the same time, well-educated young Tibetans face a number of existential as well as practical difficulties linked to their life as stateless refugees. While monastic communities in exile have received considerable attention from scholars, little focus has been placed on young lay Tibetans in recent years, in spite of a situation of rapid social change and mounting expectations – as well as frustrations – in this section of the Tibetan diaspora community in India. This year’s Aris Lecture will explore some of these issues as expressed by a young Tibetan poet, Tenzin Kesang, through a selection of her recent poems.

4. Fourth Aris Lecture, 15 November 2018, 6:15pm, LWA:

Dr Sam van Schaik (British Library): Magic, Healing, and Ethics in Tibetan Buddhism

Books of spells are a constant but little studied aspect of Tibetan Buddhism. Used by lay people as well as monks and nuns, they contain a variety of rituals covering divination, healing and protection, making rain and stopping hail, and summoning and exorcising spirits and demons. Some books of spells contain other kinds of spells as well, such as to make someone fall in love, or to gain powers of clairvoyance, invisibility, and finding hidden treasure. Some, but not all books of spells contain aggressive spells -- what we commonly call 'black magic'. This talk looks at the role of books of spells in Tibetan Buddhism, and how the use of magic fits within the Buddhist ethical framework.

5. Fifth Aris Lecture, 5 December 2019

The next Aris Lecture will be delivered by Dr Diana Lange (Humboldt University of Berlin): details to follow.

More Information
Downloads
Presentation of Anthony and Michael Aris – Per KvaerneDownload
Beyond Representation and Identity: Opening Ways for Tibetan Studies – Janet GyatsoDownload
Social History and Vampires - Charles RambleDownload
Teach me how to be Gesar's daughter - Per KvaerneDownload
Magic, Healing, and Ethics in Tibetan Buddhism - Sam van SchaikDownload
News
Events

The latest from Wolfson College

Homes4All at Wolfson College
11 March 2019
Wolfson College makes its annual donation to eight individual charities

Each year the College's Social Committee shortlist eight national and local charities to receive a donation of £400. 

7 March 2019
Alumnus Phil Hewitt publishes book on recovery after trauma

In February 2016, marathon runner and journalist Phil Hewitt were attacked in Cape Town. Deeply traumatised by the attack, he turned to running -...

Art by Dominique Zinkpè
6 March 2019
New works of art in the Haldane Room and Upper Common Room

The College is delighted to announce that new artworks are on display in the Haldane Room and the Upper Common Room by contemporary African...

Our upcoming events

Clubs & Societies
31 - 31
Mar Mar
Romulus Call for Contributions
Sunday 31 March - 11:59pm

Looking to express your creative side? Romulus, Wolfson College's literary magazine, welcomes submissions in the form of poems, short stories, essays, papers, photos, illustrations, or anything else that can be printed. This year's theme is Ritual. Written pieces should generally be no longer than 2,500 words. Academic papers are welcome, but should be accessible to a general audience. 

Lectures and Seminars
15 - 16
Apr Apr
Oxford Symposium in Silicon Solar Cell Technology
Monday 15 April - 9:00am to Tuesday 16 April - 6:00pm
Lectures and Seminars
02 - 02
May May
Wolfson Lecture Series 2018-19: Diplomacy for the 21st Century: Twenty-first cen...
Thursday 2 May - 6:15pm to 7:15pm

After 35 years in diplomacy, Sir Tim Hitchens considers how 21st century will be different from 20th century diplomacy. He will consider the evolution of diplomatic tradecraft, and the different cultures of diplomacy around the world.