Freedom of Speech Policy

Free speech is the lifeblood of a university. It enables the pursuit of knowledge. It helps us approach truth. It allows students, teachers and researchers to become better acquainted with the variety of beliefs, theories and opinions in the world. Recognising the vital importance of free expression for the life of the mind, a university may make rules concerning the conduct of debate but should never prevent speech that is lawful.

Inevitably, this will mean that members of the University/College are confronted with views that some find unsettling, extreme or offensive. The University/College must therefore foster freedom of expression within a framework of robust civility. Not all theories deserve equal respect. A university values expertise and intellectual achievement as well as openness. But, within the bounds set by law, all voices or views which any member of our community considers relevant should be given the chance of a hearing. Wherever possible, they should also be exposed to evidence, questioning and argument. As an integral part of this commitment to freedom of expression, we will take steps to ensure that all such exchanges happen peacefully. With appropriate regulation of the time, place and manner of events, neither speakers nor listeners should have any reasonable grounds to feel intimidated or censored.

It is this understanding of the central importance and specific roles of free speech in a university that underlies the detailed procedures of the University of Oxford/Wolfson College, laid out below.


College policy on Freedom of Speech

The College is committed to ensuring freedom of speech within the law. College members who are also students or employees of the University should also have regard to the University of Oxford Code of Practice on Freedom of Speech. [Issued on 9 February 2015 under section 43 of the Education (No 2) Act 1986: University of Oxford Code of Practice on Freedom of Speech

Members, students and employees of Wolfson College must conduct themselves so as to ensure that freedom of speech within the law is secured for members, students and employees of the College, and for visiting speakers.

The College agrees to the following principles governing Freedom of Speech on its premises and at its events:

  • All speakers and audience members alike are reminded of their responsibility to observe the College’s policy on harassment.
  • In any case where the College is proposing to grant permission to an outside organisation or group to hold meetings or events on College premises, the outside organisation or group shall be required to act in accordance with the College Policy on Freedom of Speech and with the University’s Code of Practice on Freedom of Speech.
  • If an event is likely to cause security concerns, the President reserves the right to relocate that event to premises where the safety of all participants can be properly provided for.
Related Policies
Browse other policies that relates to this policy
News
Events

The latest from Wolfson College

LWA
6 November 2017
Aris Lecture 2017

This year's lecture will be delivered by Emeritus Professor, University of Oslo, Per Kvaerne and Tenzin Kesang of Dharamsala.

Greg Woolf RSL17
30 October 2017
The Ronald Syme Lecture: Migration and the Metropolis: How ancient Rome stayed great

Professor Greg Woolf delivers the Ronald Syme Lecture this year.

23 October 2017
Imagining the Divine: Exhibition

Wolfson scholars collaborate on a unique exhibition on the art of major world religions at the Ashmolean Museum.

Our upcoming events

Networking
21 - 21
Nov Nov
Social Science Table
Tuesday 21 November -
12:45pm to 1:45pm

The Wolfson Social Science Tables are for any Wolfsonians and guests who want to get together every now and again to talk social science. Whether you’re a student or a fellow, whether you've come back from 2 years in the field or have spent the last 2 years struggling with Stata (or a manuscript!), whether you’re an eminent geographer or just someone who wants to figure out what social science means, we’d love to see you at the tables.

Lectures and Seminars
21 - 21
Nov Nov
Lives and Letters
Tuesday 21 November -
5:30pm to 7:00pm

This discussion centres on an understanding and appreciation of letters as repositories of complex meaning, creating unique possibilities that weave together the textual, visual, material, biographical, and cultural. Robert Douglas-Fairhurst and Matt Bevis, University of Oxford, and Hugh Haughton, University of York, will talk about their work on literary letters in relation to life-writing and biographical practice.

Lectures and Seminars
23 - 23
Nov Nov
Travelling and Filming in Gandhara
Thursday 23 November -
5:00pm to 6:30pm

In this public lecture of the Classical Art Research Centre's Gandhara Connections project, the historian and broadcaster Michael Wood will be showing film footage and talking about his travels in the area of ancient Gandhara (roughly northern Pakistan and eastern Afghanistan) in the course of more than thirty years of documentary film making.