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Agent-based modelling of accent retraction in Balto-Slavic

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Add to Calendar Agent-based modelling of accent retraction in Balto-SlavicThe Florey Room
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Toby Hudson
Event price
free
Booking Required
Not Required
This presentation concerns a method for simulating a type of drift attested in historical linguistics. Over time, the phonology of a language can change without more drastic outside influences (such as language contact, or analogical levelling), because in spoken communication both speaker and listener are responsible for phonetic variation (see e.g. Ohala 1981). This means that there is always a distribution of pronunciation variants in flux, irrespective of language users’ commitment to conserve traditional pronunciations.



refreshment provided
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Wolfson Reading Group

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Add to Calendar Wolfson Reading GroupThe Florey Room
Location
The Florey Room
The Wolfson Reading Group is holding its first face-to-face meeting since lockdown. We will be discussing The Promise by Damon Galgut, winner of the 2021 Booker Prize. New members always welcome.

XML Research Seminar: Deep learning strategies for ultrasound in pregnancy

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Add to Calendar XML Research Seminar: Deep learning strategies for ultrasound in pregnancyThe Florey Room
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Yi Yin
Booking Required
Not Required

"Ultrasound is the most commonly used diagnostic imaging technique during pregnancy. It is cheap, does not require ionizing radiation and can be performed at the bedside. Despite these advantages, it does have some drawbacks such as relatively low imaging quality, low contrast, and high variability. With these constraints, automating the interpretation of ultrasound images is challenging. With the development of hardware and open-source software packages, deep learning has emerged, achieving state-of-the-art performance in various research fields, notably medical image analysis involving classification, segmentation, and object detection. Due to its increased performance with large dataset, it has gained great interest in clinical practice. I will first talk about the deep learning applications to ultrasound in pregnancy, and then introduce our fully automated ultrasound screening tool developed based on deep learning and image processing techniques and its application to the human placenta in early pregnancy."

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XML Research Seminar: Application of deep learning in fetal heart rate monitoring

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Add to Calendar XML Research Seminar: Application of deep learning in fetal heart rate monitoringThe Florey Room
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Daniel Asfaw
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
N/A
Cardiotocography (CTG) is widely used to monitor fetal heart rate (FHR) during labor and assess the wellbeing of the baby. CTG signals are commonly interpreted visually, challenging, mundane, and prone to error due to high inter- and intra-operator variabilities. While computer-based methods have been developed to detect abnormal CTG patterns automatically by mimicking clinical guidelines, they have poor accuracy due to a variety of complex reasons, resulting in missed opportunities to prevent harm as well as leading to unnecessary interventions. More recently, data-driven approaches using deep learning methods have shown promising performance in CTG classification to detect academia around the time of birth.

Byzantine iconography workshop

Add to Calendar 2021-11-27T10:30:002021-11-27T16:00:00 Byzantine iconography workshopThe Florey Room
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Dr. Elena Ene Draghici-Vasilescu
Event price
£12
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Required
Accessibility
There is provision for wheelchair users.
Contact name
Dr. Elena Ene Draghici-Vasilescu
Contact email
elena.ene-v@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

Workshop on Byzantine iconography.

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XML talk: Machine learning-driven small molecule screening analysis for myocardial infarction treatment

Add to Calendar 2020-03-12T17:30:002020-03-12T17:30:00 XML talk: Machine learning-driven small molecule screening analysis for myocardial infarction treatmentThe Florey Room
Lectures and Seminars
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Dr Sophia Malandraki-Miller
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
There is provision for wheelchair users.
Contact name
Stephen Suryasentana
Contact email
stephen.suryasentana@eng.ox.ac.uk

Myocardial infarction (MI) results in the loss of millions of cardiomyocytes, and the formation of a non-contractile scar, ultimately leading to heart failure. Despite more than a decade of research on cardiac regeneration, clinical study results using standard stem cell approaches have been disappointing and currently the only cure is heart transplantation. One possible solution is to identify novel small molecules that can activate the resident epicardial cells in the human heart, by promoting Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), and regenerate the infarcted heart. This talk will present the results of the drug screens we have developed using a machine learning-based image analysis protocol, which allows us to automatically calculate the percentage of EMT for each experimental image. Free Pizza will be served after the talk.

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SARC: Poetry of Belonging Muslim Imaginings of India 1850-1950

Add to Calendar 2020-03-11T17:00:002020-03-11T17:00:00 SARC: Poetry of Belonging Muslim Imaginings of India 1850-1950The Florey Room
Lectures and Seminars
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Ali Khan Mahmudabad (Ashoka University, India); Faisal Devji (Oxford University)
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
There is provision for wheelchair users.
Contact name
Maryam Aslany
Contact email
maryam.aslany@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

Poetry of Belonging is an exploration of north-Indian Muslim identity at a time when the Indian nation state did not exist. Between 1850 and 1950, when precolonial forms of cultural traditions such as the musha’irah were undergoing deep and intricate transformations, certain Muslim voices imagined, negotiated, and articulated ways of what it meant to be Muslim through new and shifting vocabularies. Using poetry as an archive, the book traces the history of the musha’irah, the formal site of the poetic symposium, as a way of understanding public spaces through the changing economic, social, political, and technological contexts of the time. It seeks to chart changing ideas of watan (homeland) and hubb-e watanī (patriotism) in order to offer new perspectives on how Muslim intellectuals, poets, political leaders, and journalists conceived of their relationship to India while simultaneously expressing attachment to the umma or transnational Muslim community.

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SARC: Hindu–Muslim Relations What Europe Might Learn from India

Add to Calendar 2020-02-27T17:00:002020-02-27T17:00:00 SARC: Hindu–Muslim Relations What Europe Might Learn from IndiaThe Florey Room
Lectures and Seminars
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Professor Jörg Friedrichs
Cluster
South Asia Research Cluster
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
There is provision for wheelchair users.
Contact name
Maryam Aslany
Contact email
maryam.aslany@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

This book reconstructs Hindu–Muslim relations from a European standpoint. Drawing from the Indian context, the author explores options for Western Europe – a region grappling with the refugee crisis and populist reactions to the growth of Muslim minorities. The author shows how India can serve not only as a model but also as a warning for Europe. For example, European liberals may learn not only from the achievements of Indian secularism but also from its crisis. Based on extensive interviews with Indians from diverse backgrounds, from politicians to social activists and from the middle class to slum dwellers, the volume investigates a wide range of perspectives: Hindu and Muslim, religious and secular, moderate and militant. Relevant, engaging and accessible, this book speaks to a broad audience of concerned citizens and policy makers. Scholars of political science, sociology, modern history, cultural studies and South Asian studies will be particularly interested.

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Dreams, Memories, Journeys: The Story of a Tibetan Family

Add to Calendar 2020-02-26T18:00:002020-02-26T18:00:00 Dreams, Memories, Journeys: The Story of a Tibetan FamilyThe Florey Room
Lectures and Seminars
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Ann Tashi Slater
Cluster
Tibetan Himalayan Studies Centre
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
No
Contact name
Daniel Wojahn
Contact email
daniel.wojahn@wolfson.ox.ac.uk

Ann Tashi Slater’s research and writing on her Tibetan family history investigate identity and cultural legacy, dialogue across generations and borders, and the responsibility of individual and collective memory. Slater will read from her work and discuss her family history from 1920s Tibet to twenty-first-century Darjeeling—including the friendship between her great-grandfather, S.W. Laden-La, and the Thirteenth Dalai Lama—offering a unique look at Tibetan social and political life in Darjeeling and Lhasa, as well as vanishing traditions.

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SARC: Chronic Illness in a Pakistani Labour Diaspora

Add to Calendar 2020-02-14T16:00:002020-02-14T16:00:00 SARC: Chronic Illness in a Pakistani Labour DiasporaThe Florey Room
Lectures and Seminars
Location
The Florey Room
Speakers
Kaveri Qureshi
Event type
Lectures and Seminars
Booking Required
Not Required
Accessibility
There is provision for wheelchair users.
Contact name
Maryam Aslany
Contact email
maryam.aslany@wolfson.ox.ac.uk
Chronic Illness in a Pakistani Labour Diaspora documents the epidemic of chronic illness that afflicts Pakistanis in Britain. Drawing on fieldwork carried out over a decade, it shows how the structures of race and class into which postwar immigrants were incorporated upon their arrival in Britain left a legacy of untimely and unjust chronic illness that has persisted and become even more entrenched over time and generations. It examines how Pakistani people have made sense of this epidemic and how it has affected families, households and livelihoods. It looks at the moral imagination chronic ill health inspires about responsibilities towards others, safety nets and care. Finally, in this context where carers so often also suffer ill health, the book examines the ethics of patience and waiting for divine intervention. Dr Kaveri Qureshi is a lecturer in Global Health Equity at the School of Social and Political Science, University of Edinburgh.